Spring 2019 Courses

Language Courses

Linguistics, Literature, Culture, and Film Courses

Language Courses
(4 credits unless otherwise noted)

BCS 1102: ELEMENTARY BOSNIAN-CROATIAN-SERBIAN II

MTWR 12:40PM-1:35PM, Derby Hall 047, Instructor: Anna Cesnjevar


BCS 2104: INTERMEDIATE BOSNIAN-CROATIAN-SERBIAN II

MTWR 11:30AM-12:25PM, Derby Hall 060, Instructor: Anna Cesnjevar


CZECH 1102: ELEMENTARY CZECH II

Day and Time TBA, Hagerty Hall 120, Instructor: Video Conference


POLISH 1102: ELEMENTARY POLISH II

TR 11:10AM-12:30PM, Hagerty Hall 145, Instructor: Izolda Wolski-Moskoff


POLISH 2104: INTERMEDIATE POLISH II

TR 2:20PM-3:40PM, Hagerty Hall 145, Instructor: Izolda Wolski-Moskoff


RUSSIAN 1101.01: ELEMENTARY RUSSIAN I

Section 0010, TWRF, 10:20-11:15AM, Hagerty Hall 351, Instructor: Andrei Cretu

Section 0020, TWRF, 3:00-3:55PM, 254 Enarson Classroom, Instructor: Tatiana Melnikova


RUSSIAN 1101.51: ELEMENTARY RUSSIAN I (SELF-PACED)
Instructor: Marina Pashkova


RUSSIAN 1101.61: ELEMENTARY RUSSIAN I (SELF-PACED) (ONLINE)
Instructor: Marina Pashkova


RUSSIAN 1102.01: ELEMENTARY RUSSIAN II

Section 0010, TWRF, 8:00AM-8:55AM, Derby Hall 048, Instructor: Anna Zaitseva

Section 0020, TWRF, 9:10AM-10:05AM, Hagerty Hall 351, Instructor: Ekaterina Tikhonyuk

Section 0030, TWRF, 10:20AM-11:15AM, 330 Enarson Classrooms, Instructor: Ke Lin


RUSSIAN 1102.51: ELEMENTARY RUSSIAN II (SELF-PACED)

Instructor: Marina Pashkova


RUSSIAN 1103.01: INTERMEDIATE RUSSIAN I

Section 0010, TWRF, 9:10AM-10:05AM, Hagerty Hall 042, Instructor: Marina Pashkova


RUSSIAN 1103.51: INTERMEDIATE RUSSIAN I (SELF-PACED)
Instructor: Marina Pashkova


RUSSIAN 2104.01: INTERMEDIATE RUSSIAN II

Section 0010, TWRF, 9:10AM-10:05AM,  Hagerty Hall 251, Instructor: Viktoriia Kim

Section 0020, TWRF, 1:50PM-2:45PM, Cockins Hall 228, Instructor: David McVey


RUSSIAN 2104.51: INTERMEDIATE RUSSIAN II (SELF-PACED)

Instructor: Marina Pashkova


RUSSIAN 2144: INTERMEDIATE RUSSIAN FOR HERITAGE SPEAKERS II

WF 8:00AM-9:20AM, Hagerty Hall 045, Instructor: Helen Myers

This is the second course designed for students who have a Russian background, hear and/or speak (to a different degree) Russian at home and want to learn to read and write in Russian, or to develop their speaking and literacy skills through formal Russian language study.

Prereq: Russian 1133.


RUSSIAN 3102: THIRD-YEAR RUSSIAN II

Section 0010: TWRF 12:40PM-1:35PM, 243 Enarson Classrooms, Instructor: Helen Myers

Section 0020: TWRF 9:10AM-10:05AM, Dulles Hall 0012, Instructor: David McVey

Prereq: 3101 (501 and 502), or permission of instructor. Not open to students with credit for 503 or 562.


RUSSIAN 3121: ADVANCED READING RUSSIAN I (SELF-PACED) -- 3 credits
Instructor: Marina Pashkova

Developing reading skills and strategies from a variety of authentic Russian sources, with special emphasis on contemporary materials Prereq: 2104.01 (407.01 or 402.01) or 2104.51 (407.51 or 402.51), or permission of instructor. Not open to students with credit for 580.51 or 581.51. Repeatable to a maximum of 3 cr hrs.


RUSSIAN 3122: ADVANCED READING RUSSIAN II (SELF-PACED) -- 3 credits
Instructor: Marina Pashkova

Further development of reading skills & strategies from authentic Russian sources, with emphasis on contemporary materials. Students register for 1-3 cr hrs during sem. Progress is sequential from one cr hr to next; 80% is required to advance. Prereq: 3121 (581.51), or permission of instructor. Not open to students with credit for 582.51. Repeatable to a maximum of 3 cr hrs.


RUSSIAN 3140: RUSSIAN CONVERSATION -- 1 credit
M 3:00PM-3:55PM, Hagerty Hall 071, Instructor: Larysa Stepanova

Maintaining and further developing conversational skills in Russian at the intermediate level. Taught in Russian as round-table discussion.  Prereq: 2104.01 (402.01) or 2104.51 (402.51), or permission of instructor. Repeatable to a maximum of 2 cr hrs.


RUSSIAN 4102: ADVANCED RUSSIAN II -- 3 credits

MWF 11:30AM-12:25PM, Arps Hall 386, Instructor: Marina Pashkova

Continuation of Russian 4101: speaking, listening, reading, and writing practice in Russian at the advanced level, with a focus on Russian culture and national identity.
Prereq: 4101 (601) or 609, or permission of instructor. Not open to students with credit for 610.


RUSSIAN 5102: FIFTH YEAR RUSSIAN I-- 3 credits

TR 8:00AM-9:20AM, Derby Hall 047, Instructor: Helen Myers


RUSSIAN 6171: BASIC READING RUSSIAN FOR GRADUATE STUDENTS (SELF-PACED) -- 3 credits
Instructor: Marina Pashkova

Russian alphabet, basic vocabulary, and basic elements of grammar for graduate students who need to develop reading skills for professional research. Taught in self-paced format. Continued by Russian 6172. Prereq: Grad standing. Not open to students with credit for 571.


RUSSIAN 6172: READING RUSSIAN FOR RESEARCH (SELF-PACED) -- 3 credits
Instructor: Marina Pashkova

Continuation of Russian 6171: further development of reading skills, vocabulary, and grammar for graduate students who need to read Russian for professional research. Taught in self-paced format.
Prereq: 6171 (571), and Grad standing. Not open to students with credit for 572 or 573.

 

Linguistics, Literature, Culture, and Film Courses
(3 credits unless otherwise noted)

 

EAST EUROPEAN LANGUAGES AND LITERATURES (EEURLL) 5627

T 3:55PM-6:00PM, Oxley Hall 103, Instructor: Brian Joseph


RUSSIAN 2250: MASTERPIECES OF RUSSIAN LITERATURE

Section 0010, WF 9:35AM-10:55AM, Bolz Hall 318, Instructor: Angela Brintlinger

Section 0020, TR 2:20PM-3:40PM, Enarson Classrooms 240, Instructor: Ray Alston

Reading and analysis of great works of Russian literature from the 19th century to the present by authors such as Pushkin, Turgenev, Dostoevsky, Tolstoy, Chekhov, Akhmatova, Bulgakov, Solzhenitsyn, and Ulitskaya. Taught in English.

Prereq: Not open to students with credit for 2250H (250H and 251H), 250, or 251.

GE Literature and GE Diversity Global Studies course


RUSSIAN 2335.01: MAGNIFICENCE, MAYHEM, AND MAFIA - RUSSIAN CULTURE

TR 9:35AM-10:55AM, Hayes Hall 006, Instructor: Ray Alston

Russia has always been a fascinating place, with its mixture of globe-shaking politics and world-class culture. The future -- whatever it holds -- promises nothing less. Through an analysis of literature, films, and the visual arts, we will learn about Russia and the USSR in the twentieth century and its impact on the world; try to understand the present of post-Soviet Russia; and imagine Russia in the future. In an attempt to comprehend the Western puzzlement in dealing with unique Russian contradictions, we will discuss the magnificence of Russian culture as well as look into the dark side of the Russian tradition, the destructive impulses of Stalinism and most recently of the return of Soviet Style politics with Vladimir Putin and the Russian Mafia. Taught in English. Prereq: Not open to students with credit for 135 or 235.

GE Cultures and Ideas and GE Diversity Global Studies course


RUSSIAN 2335.99: MAGNIFICENCE, MAYHEM, AND MAFIA - RUSSIAN CULTURE (ONLINE)

Instructor: Ludmila Isurin

Russia has always been a fascinating place, with its mixture of globe-shaking politics and world-class culture. The future -- whatever it holds -- promises nothing less. Through an analysis of literature, films, and the visual arts, we will learn about Russia and the USSR in the twentieth century and its impact on the world; try to understand the present of post-Soviet Russia; and imagine Russia in the future. In an attempt to comprehend the Western puzzlement in dealing with unique Russian contradictions, we will discuss the magnificence of Russian culture as well as look into the dark side of the Russian tradition, the destructive impulses of Stalinism and most recently of the return of Soviet Style politics with Vladimir Putin and the Russian Mafia. Taught in English. Prereq: Not open to students with credit for 135 or 235. Offered entirely online.

GE Cultures and Ideas and GE Diversity Global Studies course


RUSSIAN 2345: RUSSIAN FAIRY TALES AND FOLKLORE

TR 3:55PM-5:15PM, Mendenhall Lab 131, Instructor: Andrei Cretu

Examines four categories of texts, both verbal and visual: (1) a survey of Russian demonology; (2) a large selection of the best-known Russian fairy tales,; (3) scholarly articles analyzing the differences between folklore and literature; and (4) visual materials (film, paintings, graphics, and handicrafts) and music inspired by Russian fairy tales. Taught in English.

GE cultures and ideas and diversity global studies course.


RUSSIAN 3460: THE MODERN RUSSIAN EXPERIENCE THROUGH FILM

Section 0010, MWF 4:10PM-5:05PM, Enarson Classrooms 358, Instructor: Elizabeth Angerman

Section 0020, TR 9:35AM-10:55AM, Campbell Hall 251, Instructor: Randall Rowe

Exploration of some of the most revealing hopes and disappointments of Russian people presented in internationally acclaimed Russian films. Taught in English. Prereq: Not open to students with credit for 360.

GE Visual and Performing Arts and GE Diversity Global Studies course


RUSSIAN 3470: ANNA KARENINA GOES TO HOLLYWOOD

TR 11:10AM-12:30PM, 119 Campbell Hall, Instructor: Alexander Burry

This course explores Tolstoy's Anna Karenina in relation to popular American culture. The course will consist of two parts: in the first half, we will read and discuss Anna Karenina, and we will then examine films and other popular works based on the novel.

GE VPA and diversity global studies course.


RUSSIAN 3530: RUSSIAN CUISINE IN HISTORY, LITERATURE, AND CULTURE

WF 12:45PM-2:05PM, Journalism Building 221, Instructor: Angela Brintlinger

Explores Russian cuisine: its history and its role in Russian literature and culture. We will use a variety of cookbooks and cultural histories as our textbooks, and we will read selections from classical Russian literature to see how writers incorporate ideas of food and cuisine into their works. We will also read critical articles about the relationship between food and culture.

GE cultures and ideas course.


RUSSIAN 4575: CAPSTONE COURSE FOR RUSSIAN MAJORS

WF 9:35AM-10:55AM, Derby Hall 024, Instructor: Daniel Collins

Junior-senior seminar explores issues of Russian language and literature, focusing on reading in Russian and on honing Russian and English oral and writing skills. Required for Russian major.

Prereq: English 2367 or equiv. Repeatable to a maximum of 9 cr hrs.


RUSSIAN 5230: UTOPIA AND DYSTOPIA IN RUSSIAN LITERATURE

TR 3:55PM-5:15PM, Hagerty Hall 045, Instructor: Alexander Burry

Russian writers of the past two centuries have been fascinated with both the idea of utopia and its reverse image of a dystopian society whose aim of perfection has led to the very opposite. In this course, we will explore realist, modernist, Soviet, and post-Soviet utopian and dystopian novels, stories, plays, and essays.

Prereq: 2250 or another course on Russian literature or culture is recommended for undergraduates.


SLAVIC 2230: VAMPIRES, MONSTROSITY, AND EVIL: FROM SLAVIC MYTH TO TWILIGHT

Section 0010, WF 12:45PM-2:05PM, 188 Baker Systems, Instructor: Daniel Collins

Section 0020, TR 12:45PM-2:05PM, Mendenhall Lab 174, Instructor: Andrei Cretu

Changing approaches to evil as embodied in vampires in East European folk belief & European & American pop culture; function of vampire & monster tales in cultural context, including peasant world & West from Enlightenment to now.  Taught in English.

Prereq: Not open to students with credit for 130.

GE cultures and ideas course, GE diversity global studies course


SLAVIC 2367: THE EAST EUROPEAN EXPERIENCE IN AMERICA

TR 11:10AM-12:30PM, Smith Lab 2006, Instructor: Philip Gleissner

Experiences of East European immigrants; assimilation vs. multiculturalism, American Dream, stereotypes, identity formation; development of written & oral communication skills. Taught in English.

Prereq: Level 1 writing course (1110), or English 110 or 111 with permission of instructor; Not open to students with credit for 367.

GE Writing and Communication: Level 2, and GE Diversity Social Diversity in the US course


SLAVIC 3310: SCIENCE FICTION EAST VS WEST

WF 11:10AM-12:30PM, Campbell Hall 243, Instructor: David McVey

Slavic, American, and British sci-fi on page and screen as reflection of major cultural concerns: progress, utopia, human perfectibility, limits of science and knowledge, gender, identity. Taught in English.

Prereq: Not open to students with credit for 3320 or WGSSt 3310. GE VPA and diversity global studies course. Cross-listed in WGSSt.


SLAVIC 3333: THE SOVIET SPACE AGE

TR 2:20PM-3:40PM, Jennings Hall 050, Instructor: Philip Gleissner

Exploration of Space Age as a technological/cultural phenomenon, focusing on the Soviet period and the Space Race, in historical context and in a comparative perspective. Taught in English.

GE cultures and ideas and diversity global studies course.


SLAVIC 3360: SCREENING MINORITIES: REPRESENTATION OF THE OTHER IN SLAVIC FILM

WF 9:35AM-10:55AM, Hagerty Hall 259, Instructor: Izolda Wolski-Moskoff

Film representations of ethnic and religious others in East European cinema.  Taught in English.

Prereq: Not open to students with credit for 360.

GE Visual and Performing Arts course


SLAVIC 6000: SLAVIC LITERATURE, FILM, AND CULTURAL STUDIES PROFESSIONALIZATION FORUM -- 1 credit

Day and Time TBA, Hagerty Hall 406, Instructor: Alexander Burry

Biweekly colloquium for presentations and discussion of research by graduate students, faculty, and visiting scholars. Required for M.A. and Ph.D. degrees in Slavic Linguistics.
Prereq: Grad standing. Repeatable to a maximum of 8 cr hrs. This course is graded S/U.


SLAVIC 6457: FILM THEORY, GENDER, AND NATIONAL IDENTITY IN SLAVIC CINEMA

W 1:00PM-4:00PM, Hagerty Hall 160, Instructor: Yana Hashamova

Introduction to film theory and exploration of changes in national and gender identities during the 20th century as reflected in Slavic cinema. Taught in English.

Prereq: Grad standing, or permission of instructor. Not open to students with credit for 657.


SLAVIC 6600: SLAVIC LINGUISTICS PROFESSIONALIZATION FORUM -- 1 credit

Day and Time TBA, Hagerty Hall 406, Instructor: TBA

Biweekly colloquium for presentations and discussion of research by graduate students, faculty, and visiting scholars. Required for M.A. and Ph.D. degrees in Slavic Linguistics. Prereq: Grad standing. Repeatable to a maximum of 8 cr hrs. This course is graded S/U.

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