2020 Naylor Memorial Lecture: “From Katpatuka to Yunanistan: The Rise, Demise, and Reawakening of Cappadocian Greek” by Dr. Mark Janse (Ghent University)

Image
Exterior of Campbell Hall
April 3, 2020
4:00PM - 5:30PM
Location
Blackwell Inn and Conference Center; Pfahl Hall 140

Date Range
Add to Calendar 2020-04-03 16:00:00 2020-04-03 17:30:00 2020 Naylor Memorial Lecture: “From Katpatuka to Yunanistan: The Rise, Demise, and Reawakening of Cappadocian Greek” by Dr. Mark Janse (Ghent University)

Mark your calendars! The 2020 Kenneth E. Naylor Memorial Lecture will be given by Mark Janse of Ghent University. Dr. Janse will present “From Katpatuka to Yunanistan: The Rise, Demise, and Reawakening of Cappadocian Greek” (abstract below).

All Naylor Lecture attendees are invited to join the opening reception of the Midwest Slavic Conference that will take place in the Ballroom of the Blackwell immediately following the conclusion of the lecture.

Abstract: Cappadocian (Asia Minor Greek) was generally believed to have died out in the 1970s, half a century after the population exchange between Greece and Turkey in 1924. In 2005, however, Naylor Lecturer Janse and his colleague from Patras, Dimitris Papazachariou, discovered native speakers of a Cappadocian dialect in northern Greece. In this lecture, Dr. Janse outlines the linguistic history of Cappadocia from the second millennium BC until the forced migration of the Cappadocians in 1924 and the rapid decline of the various Cappadocian dialects in Greece after the exchange and then discusses efforts to revitalize Cappadocian.

Blackwell Inn and Conference Center; Pfahl Hall 140 Department of Slavic and East European Languages and Cultures slavicdept@osu.edu America/New_York public
Description

Mark your calendars! The 2020 Kenneth E. Naylor Memorial Lecture will be given by Mark Janse of Ghent University. Dr. Janse will present “From Katpatuka to Yunanistan: The Rise, Demise, and Reawakening of Cappadocian Greek” (abstract below).

All Naylor Lecture attendees are invited to join the opening reception of the Midwest Slavic Conference that will take place in the Ballroom of the Blackwell immediately following the conclusion of the lecture.

Abstract: Cappadocian (Asia Minor Greek) was generally believed to have died out in the 1970s, half a century after the population exchange between Greece and Turkey in 1924. In 2005, however, Naylor Lecturer Janse and his colleague from Patras, Dimitris Papazachariou, discovered native speakers of a Cappadocian dialect in northern Greece. In this lecture, Dr. Janse outlines the linguistic history of Cappadocia from the second millennium BC until the forced migration of the Cappadocians in 1924 and the rapid decline of the various Cappadocian dialects in Greece after the exchange and then discusses efforts to revitalize Cappadocian.